Hair Colorist: The Lessons Behind the Career

Steps to Becoming A Professional Hair Colorist

Although people have been coloring their hair for thousands of years, modern advancements now allow you to achieve any hair color possible. With so many new and exciting hair coloring products, experts at Technavio expect the global hair color market to grow by 13.75 billion dollars by 2025.

This rise in market value also means that there will be a rise in hair colorist job opportunities. So, if you’ve ever wanted to become a hair colorist, then now is the time to make it happen.  

If you’re interested in a career in hair coloring but are unsure where to start, then this article is for you. Here are the steps you need to take to become a hair color specialist to set you on the right path.   

Sign up for Cosmetology School

The first step is to enroll in a cosmetology school like the Salon Professional Academy of Delray Beach.

But why would you need to go to cosmetology school if you want hair stylist training? The answer is simple; before you learn about hair color, you must learn the basics of hairstyling. This is because the two go hand in hand and are both necessary to learn to create complete looks for your clients. 

TSPA instructors are trained in the latest hair trends to help you start your career as a professional hair colorist on the right foot. You’ll learn popular hair color techniques like balayage, ombre, and sombre. 

 Moreover, as a TSPA student, you’ll get hands-on training in a professional salon environment. But your journey doesn’t end when you complete your training and graduate. 

Pass the State Board Licensing Exam 

Once you finish cosmetology school, you’ll need to pass the State Board exam to earn your official license and start working with clients. Each state has its own requirements of how many training and practice hours you have to do to earn your cosmetology license.

In addition to your hair colorist training, your TSPA instructors will be able to prepare you to ace your State Board exam. 

Earn Your Hair Color Certification 

The final step is to earn your hair color certification. Your certification is different than your cosmetology license and equally as important. While you’ll get basic hair colorist training in cosmetology school, you may consider going through more specialized hair color schooling for licensed professionals to become a leading professional hair color specialist.

Become a Hair Colorist by Following These Steps 

Now that you know what steps are necessary to become a hair colorist, you’re ready to turn your hair coloring dreams into a reality.

There’s no better place to start your journey than with TSPA. TSPA graduates have limitless cosmetology career opportunities after they complete their training. 

You’re welcome to contact us or stop by TSPA Delray Beach, Florida, to learn more about our classes or services anytime. 

Steps to Becoming A Professional Hair Colorist in Delray Beach Florida

The Surprising Chemistry Behind Beauty Careers

Beauty: Not Your Average Chemistry Set

 

According to national statistics, beauty careers are growing fast. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 119,800 new beautician jobs will open in the next year. 

But some stylists get stuck making low salaries and never manage to progress. How do you make yours the career of your dreams? To set yourself up for success, you need to think bigger than basic hair-and-makeup skills. 

In fact, some beauticians launch six-figure careers with a surprising knowledge base: biochemistry. Read on to learn how to jumpstart a high-end beauty career—and discover what biochemistry has to do with it!

 What is Required to Start a Beauty Career?

You’ll need different kinds of knowledge depending on what type of beauty career you are looking for. Certain popular makeup artists, particularly on YouTube, learned their skills independently. But many beauty careers require formal education.

Clinical estheticians, cosmetic chemists, and beauty product inventors often have advanced post-secondary degrees. Other beauty careers benefit from professional training, even if it’s not legally mandatory.  

 What Does Biochemistry Have to Do With a Beauty Career?

Biochemistry is a branch of science that studies the chemistry of living things. This can include humans. Discoveries at the molecular level can fuel incredible innovation. 

This, in turn, leads to the invention of great beauty products. 

 Cosmetic Chemists

A cosmetic chemist develops formulas for skincare, haircare, and makeup products. They’re akin to chefs; they develop “recipes” for products.

One famous cosmetic chemist is Andy Gilreath from L’Oréal Labs. She got her degree in chemistry at Penn State. When she talks about her work, she enjoys the puzzle-solving elements of her job. How do you create an oxygenating face mask that doesn’t disappear too quickly? How do you create a brow pen that enables precise contouring, but still applies smoothly?

You, too, can solve these puzzles. But you must know the chemical properties of different compounds. Every beauty product company hires cosmetic chemists to develop and test products. 

Synthesis Engineers (Nail Professional Edition)

Synthesis engineers are also called materials scientists. They might also have a more specific title, like polymer scientist, depending on what they do.  

In the beauty market, synthesis engineers use biochemistry to create new manicure products. Recently, Nails Magazine broke down the chemistry of acrylic nail polish. When you understand the properties of different polymers, you create better nail products.  

Medical or Clinical Estheticians

Medical estheticians are skincare professionals. They primarily see clients who are dermatology patients. They may even work in a dermatologist’s office.

Unlike other estheticians, clinical estheticians must understand the biochemistry that underlies:

  • Psoriasis
  • Acne
  • Scars
  • Eczema
  • Other skin conditions

A medical esthetician applies treatments for these conditions. They also make recommendations that may improve patient prognosis. Most states set educational requirements for clinical estheticians that mandate some biochemistry classes. 

How to Start a Beauty Career Today

Ready to jumpstart your beauty career? Deciding among beauty careers means considering:

  • How much formal education do you want to pursue?
  • Are you more of a scientist or an artist?
  • What type of clients do you want to work with? 

At The Salon Professional Academy in Delray Beach, our advisers can help you sort through the possibilities. Contact us today, and learn about what we offer, available scholarships, and how to book a tour of the campus. You can even apply online right away.